Rescue Tube at Public Beach Access #7.

Since 2010, 6 people have drowned on Navarre Beach in the unguarded area that these rescue tube stations will cover.  In two instances, the victim of drowning was attempting to rescue a swimmer in distress.

Rescue tubes have shown to be effective in helping both swimmers in distress and the Samaritan attempting to assist them in reaching the beach safely.

Rotary Club of Navarre, in cooperation with Santa Rosa County, installed fourteen (14) rescue tube stations along Navarre Beach at each public access point on the Gulf Side.  We are covering the expense to build, install, maintain and replenish the rescue tube stations.

Learn more about our rescue tube project and beach safety at SAFERNavarrebeach.org.

These stations are comprised of a post sunk into the sand near each public access point with signage that explains what to do in case of accident and a rescue tube mounted with a Velcro strap that allows for quick access in case of a water emergency.

  • Rescue tubes are on station 24/7/365 and easy to use and provide a safer way for a Samaritan to assist a swimmer in distress.
  • Rescue tubes allow for immediate response to a swimmer in distress.
  • Each rescue tube station would by numbered and mapped in the 911 emergency systems to better guide emergency responders to the correct beach access for all types of emergencies.
  • The rescue tubes are easy to install and maintain and have low installation and maintenance costs.
  • The rescue tubes will typically last 2-3 years and then need replacing. And Hawaii has seen a low instance of loss (less than 20%) with their installed tubes.

Here is a video from Hawaii about how to use the rescue tube.

Rescue Tube Project Updates